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Alice Wu
Alice Wu
Alice Wu fell down the rabbit hole of politics aged 12, when she ran her first election campaign. She has been writing about local politics and current affairs for the Post since 2008. Alice's daily needs include her journals, books, a multi-coloured pen and several lattes.

Factoring the rail operator’s property profits into the fare adjustment formula looked like a win for commuters last year. But when a company with billions in profits is allowed to hike prices in the current economic climate, it leaves the public feeling short-changed.

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The pilot programme was supposed to show Hongkongers how the waste charging scheme works, but a tiny trial run and multiple delays inspire little confidence. This is bad for public perception and adds fuel to the fire of speculation whether the government will actually implement the scheme in full on August 1.

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As the government continues to promote Hong Kong as an art and cultural hub in the region, it has much to learn about what truly constitutes art. Jin Yong’s wuxia novels, with their wide appeal, manage to be both escapist entertainment and a vast cultural phenomenon.

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After years of posting pandemic-related losses, Cathay Pacific reporting a net profit of HK$9.79 billion in 2023 is a welcome bit of good news for the city. If our flag carrier is to recover its status as the pride of Hong Kong, the city’s people need to give it their support and celebrate a good Hong Kong story.

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Hong Kong officials need to take the political will shown in enacting Article 23 legislation and direct it towards the delayed waste charging scheme. Without more efforts to provide recycling facilities and educate the public, the scheme is a disaster in the making.

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Paul Chan had the unenviable task of delivering a budget with little good news for regular Hongkongers, in particular the end of many popular support schemes. If few other good ideas are forthcoming, it’s still better to take the time to think things through rather than rush off in the wrong direction.

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A pro-establishment lawmaker’s criticism of a former Legco president’s questions about certain aspects of the proposed Article 23 legislation is troubling. The director of the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, who is visiting the city, could clarify how patriotism and constructive criticism can coexist.

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The giant heart-shaped balloons installed around the city, like the giant rubber ducks in Victoria Harbour before them, are more than a seasonal display. They evoke emotions ranging from childlike delight to nostalgia, and are an opportunity to practise gratitude – especially for the city we call home.

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Forget the humiliation of Messi, mainland jibes and economic disappointments. We need to get back to basics, leave the government to do its job and rediscover the Hong Kong spirit for ourselves.

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Whatever the reasons the Amazon Prime Video series, which includes scenes of the 2014 protests, is not available for viewing in Hong Kong, officials should take the opportunity to reflect on the role they play in any misperceptions of the city

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Beyond a public-relations nightmare, recent comments by government officials show they appear just as confused about the reason for the scheme as the public.

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Fear of missing out on the latest trend or a great bargain may be motivating Hongkongers to make a beeline for big-box retailers across the border. However, the wider economic and environmental impact of this style of retailing deserves attention.

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If the Hong Kong government is going to ease the pressure on the city’s A&E departments, it would do well to learn from the failures of Cathay Pacific. In both cases, the flu season that exacerbated the staffing shortage can’t be blamed.

The sight of thousands of mainland visitors left stranded after attending New Year’s Eve celebrations was disappointing and preventable. The government’s inability to prepare for and respond to issues inspires little confidence in planned mega projects and visions for Hong Kong’s future.

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Hong Kong needs more than optimism and vibes to get through the challenges of a slowing economy, growing deficit and shrinking reserves. The outlook requires cautious optimism and a heavy dose of reality, not lavish spending on fanciful projects.

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Tough questions must be asked about the election’s record low voter turnout and how defanged political parties can play a more ‘constructive’ role in an overhauled system

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The ban on pet dogs in public housing estates is inconsistent with the government’s pet-friendly policies – Singapore’s example shows how a balance can be achieved.

Lack of planning is why the cruise terminal has just one road accessing it, the neighbourhood has no monorail and public transport is simply inadequate. The government has to get its act together.

Priscilla Leung’s off-script warning at a Basic Law forum that any discussion of gay marriage could tear society apart and have a bigger impact than the enactment of local national security laws merits deeper scrutiny.

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The ‘good’ and ‘true’ stories of Hong Kong won’t change minds overseas, as long as uncertainty lingers over the city’s national security legislation. Furthermore, the talk of Hong Kong needing to overcome ‘soft resistance’ doesn’t inspire confidence in the city’s future as a financial and innovation hub.

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Reports that student withdrawals are dropping are welcome, but the news is at odds with the government cutting classes and closing schools. A paltry grant meant to improve mental health and heaping more work on overburdened teachers doesn’t send the right signal either.

John Lee said during his recent policy address that he has faith in the people of Hong Kong, but the actions of his government tell a different story. Stripping power from district councils, cutting directly elected seats and barring the opposition from running don’t appear to be enough.

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John Lee sowed the seeds of divide in his policy address in singling out those with ‘negativity’ – but writing them off blinds us to what plagues us as a community and defeats any chance of unity.

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With Covid-19 a non-issue and domestic politics stable, people expect Lee’s administration to start delivering on economic growth, livelihood issues, housing and, crucially, hope.

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The openness of Matthew Tsang’s parents about his mental health struggles can help us as a community remember to pay attention to the issues affecting young people’s well-being. The sensationalised media reporting by some is also a reminder of the importance of protecting newsmakers’ privacy.

Our athletes haven’t just made history, they are telling the stories Hong Kong needs to hear about overcoming the odds and showing hard work pays off. John Lee’s promise of celebrations is good but it’s time to really support sports.

The fanfare over the launch of ‘Night Vibes Hong Kong’ did not prevent the Wan Chai night bazaar tripping up over something as basic as steady power supply. Unless the city gets to grips with the fundamental obstacles impeding its growth and happiness, feel-good campaigns will provide only a temporary boost.

Political powerlessness fuelled 2019’s social unrest. Sweeping political changes since then have left Hongkongers disengaged, and deep trust issues remain. The authorities must work on re-engaging the electorate.

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Without the change wrought by the #MeToo movement, flawed as it was, the Spanish football chief wouldn’t have quit over an unwanted kiss. However, as recent events in Hong Kong and Japan show, women and men are still vulnerable to sexual harassment and abuses of power.

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